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Built-in Methods

Page history last edited by Don Slater 8 years, 4 months ago

Reference: Built-in Methods

 

 

 

 

 

The Methods panel has three tabs so as to distinguish between procedural methods, functional methods, and methods related to that object's specific properties. This figure illustrates the three tabs in a side-by-side listing, using penny (an instance of Penguin) as an example.

 

Side-by-side listing of built-in procedural, functional, and property methods

 

Important concepts:

  • Procedural methods describe actions that may be performed by an object, such as move, turn, or roll. These actions often change the location and/or orientation of an object. The important thing to know about procedural methods is that they each perform an action but do not compute and return an answer to a question.
  • Functional methods are expressions that compute and answer a question about an object such as what is its width or height, or what is its distance from another object. 
  • Properties methods aremethods for retrieving (get) and changing (set) specific properties of an object of this class. These specific properties, such as paint, opacity, name, and vehicle, are used in animation rendering. 

 

As a convenient reference, the remainder of this section describes the method tiles commonly found in the Procedures, Functions, and Properties tabs for an object in a scene. The Figures and examples use the alien object, as seen in this screenshot.

 

 

PROCEDURAL METHODS

 

Change the size of an object

Every object in Alice has three dimensions, all having a height, width, and depth (even if the value of that dimension is 0.0; e.g., a disc may have a height of 0.0). These procedures change the size of an Alice object, by changing all the dimensions at the same time, proportionately. Procedures that change the value of height, width, or depth are shown in the figure and summarized in the following table.

 

Procedures that change the size of an object

 

The set procedures change that dimension to the absolute size provided in the statement. For example if the alien has a height of 1.5 meters, the statement

 

alien.setHeight height: 2.0

 

will animate the alien growing to a height of 2.0 meters. The value 2.0 is an argument to the method, to be used as the targeted height.

 

The resize procedures change a dimension by the factor of the argument value provided in the statement. For example if the same alien has a height of 1.5 meters, the statement alien.resizeHeight factor: 2.0 will animate the alien growing to the height of 3.0 meters, as the height of the alien is increased by a factor of 2.

 

Procedures that change the size of an object

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

setWidth

DecimalNumber

Changes the value of the object's width to the value of the argument width, with width and depth changed proportionately.

setHeight

DecimalNumber

Changes the value of the object's height to the value of the argument height, with height and depth changed proportionately.

setDepth

DecimalNumber

Changes the value of the object's depth to the value of the argument depth, with height and width changed proportionately.

resize

DecimalNumber

Changes all the dimensions of the object by the value of the argument factor, proportionately

resizeWidth

DecimalNumber

Changes the width dimension of the object by the value of the argument factor, with height and depth changed proportionately.

resizeHeight

DecimalNumber

Changes the height dimension of the object by the value of the argument factor, with width and depth changed proportionately.

resizeDepth

DecimalNumber

Changes the depth dimension of the object by the value of the argument factor, with height and width changed proportionately.

 

Change the position of an object in the scene

Every object in Alice has a specific position and orientation in the scene. Each object can move to its left or right, forward or backward, up or down. Procedures that change an object’s position are shown  in the figure and summarized in the following table.

 

Procedures that change the position of an object in the scene

 

Procedures that move an object to a different position in the scene

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

move

Direction, DecimalNumber

Animates movement of the object in the specified direction according to its own orientation, by the specified amount

moveToward

Model, DecimalNumber

Animates movement of the object, by the specified amount, in the direction of the target object (a 3D Model)

moveAwayFrom

Model, DecimalNummber

Animates movement of the object, by the specified amount, directly away from the position of the target object (a 3D Model)

moveTo

Model

Animates movement of the object, in the direction of the target object (a 3D Model) until the pivot point of the object and the pivot point of the target are exactly the same; the original orientation of the object is unchanged.

moveAndOrientTo

Model

Animates movement in the direction of the target object (a 3D Model) until the pivot point of the object and the pivot point of the target are in exactly the same position and the orientation of the object is the same as the orientation of the target object.

place

spatialRelation:

ABOVE, BELOW, RIGHT_OF, LEFT_OF, IN_FRONT_OF, BEHIND; Model

Animates movement of the object, so that it ends up 1 meter from the target object (a 3D Model) along the specified spatialRelation

 

Change the orientation of an object in the scene

Every object in Alice has a specific orientation in the scene, with its own sense of forward and backward, leftand right, up and down. Importantly, each object has a pivot or center point, around which these rotations occur. Procedures that change an object’s position are shown  in the figure and summarized in the following table.

 

Procedures that rotate an object

 

Turn rotations can be LEFT, RIGHT, FORWARD, or BACKWARD. Roll rotations can only be LEFT or RIGHT. The rotations occur in the direction of an object's own orientation, not the camera's point of view and not as seen by the viewer of the animation. For example, if an object is given an instruction to turn LEFT, the object will turn to its own left (which may or may not be the same as left for the person viewing the animation).

 

The amount of a rotation is always described as a fractional part of a full rotation, expressed as a decimal value. For example, the statement

 

alien.turn direction: RIGHT, amount: 0.25

 

will animate the alien turning to its right ¼ of a full rotation, expressed as 0.25. Although a full rotation is 360 degrees and ¼ rotation is 90 degrees, Alice does not use degrees to specify the rotation amount. So, always convert any amount in degrees to a fractional part of a rotation, expressed as a decimal value.

 

Generally a turn will result in an object's sense of forward changing as the animation occurs, although it may come back to its original orientation if it turns all the way around. A roll will result in an object's sense of up changing as the animation occurs, although it may come back to its original orientation if it rolls all the way around. It may be helpful to note that an object's sense of forward stays the same during a roll.

 

 

Procedural methods that rotate an object

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

turn

Direction, DecimalNumber

Animates a turn of an object around its pivot point, in the specified direction according to its own orientation, by the specified amount, given in fractional parts of a rotation. The object's sense of forward will be changing during the animation

roll

Direction, DecimalNumber

Animates a roll of the object around its pivot point, in the specified direction according to its own orientation, by the specified amount, given in fractional parts of a rotation. The object's sense of forward will remain unchanged during the animation

turnToFace

Model

Animates a turn of the object around its pivot point, so that its sense of forward will be in the direction of the target (a 3D Model object)

orientToUpright

 

Animates a rotation of the object around its pivot point, so that its sense of up will be perpendicular to the ground

pointAt

Model

Animates a rotation of the object around its pivot point, so that its sense of forward will be in the direction of the target’s (a 3D Model object) pivot point

orientTo

Model

Animates a rotation of the object around its pivot point, so that its orientation will be exactly the same as the orientation of the target (a 3D Model object). The object's position will be unchanged.

 

Other procedures

Some procedures do not neatly fit into the descriptive categories of the preceding paragraphs. We have collected these procedures into a category called “Other.” These procedures provide program output (say, think, playAudio), manage timing in an animation (delay), simplify returning an object to its original position after an animation (straightenOutJoints), and allow one object to be the vehicle for another object as it moves around the scene (setVehicle). The Other procedures are shown in the figure and summarized in the following table.

 

Other procedures

 

 

Other procedures

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

straightenOutJoints

 

Restores all the joints of this object to their original position, when this object was first constructed in the scene editor

say

textString

A speech bubble appears in the scene, containing the value of the text argument, representing something said by this object

think

textString

A thought bubble appears in the scene, containing the value of the text argument, representing something thought by this object

setVehicle

Model

Any movement or rotation of the target (a 3D Model object) will produce a corresponding movement by this object. This object cannot be a vehicle for itself, and two objects may not have a reciprocal vehicle relationship (in other words, this object cannot be the vehicle of the target object, if the target object is already the vehicle for this object)

delay

DecimalNumber

The animation pauses for the length of the duration in seconds

playAudio

??? (sound file)

The entire imported sound file (either .mp3 or .wav format) will be played in the animation. The length of sound clip that is actually played can be modified in AudioSource drop-down menu and selecting Custom Audio Source… See Chapter 5: How to…

 

Important concepts

Do in order 

    • When a delay action is performed within a Do in orderAlice waits the specified number of seconds before proceeding to the next statement. Calling a delay on the scene will suspend the animation until the delay is complete.
    • When a playAudio action is performed within a Do in order, Alice plays the sound for the specified amount of time before proceeding to the next statement.

 

Do together

    • When a delay action is performed within a Do together, other statements within the Do together are not affected. However, the delay does set a minimum duration for execution of the code block within the Do together. For example, in the code block shown below, the alien will move and turn at the same time (duration of 1 second), but Alice will not proceed to the statement following the Do together until the delay is completed (2 seconds).

 

Do together

alien.turn direction: RIGHT, amount: 0.25

alien.delay duration:2.0

alien.move direction: FORWARD, amount: 1.00

 

 bunny.turn direction: LEFT, amount: 1.0

 

    • When a playAudio action is performed within a Do togetherAlice plays the sound at the same time as other statements within the Do together are executing (for example, as background music).

 

Use detail parameter options

Most procedures in Alice have a set of parameters with default argument values. These are known as detail parameters. The detail parameters enhance or fine tune the animation action performed when a statement is executed.

 

 

The three most common detail parameters are asSeenBy, duration, and animationStyle. There are a few procedures that may not use all of these details, or they may have a different set of details, appropriate for that particular animation. This table summarizes the detail parameter options.

 

Details

Detail

Values

Description

asSeenBy

Model

The movement or rotational animation of this object will be as if this object had the pivot point position and orientation of the target object

duration

DecimalNumber

By default, Alice animation methods execute in 1 second. This modifier changes the duration value to a specified length of time.

animationStyle

BEGIN_AND_END_ABRUPTLY BEGIN_GENTLY_AND_END_ABRUPTLY BEGIN_ABRUPTLY_AND_END_GENTLY BEGIN_AND_END_GENTLY

The default animation style is BEGIN_AND_END_GENTLY, which begins with a reasonable period of acceleration, then constant movement at some top speed, followed by a reasonable period of deceleration.

 

Other animation styles:

BEGIN_GENTLY_AND_END_ABRUPTLY begins with a gradual acceleration to top speed and ends with a sudden stop.

 

BEGIN_ABRUPTLY_AND_END_GENTLY starts at top speed and ends with gradual deceleration.

 

BEGIN_AND_END_ABRUPTLY starts at top speed and ends with a sudden stop.

 

 

FUNCTIONAL METHODS

 

Functions that provide access (a link) to an internal joint of an object

The internal joints of an object are part of a skeletal system. For this reason, a function is called to access an individual joint within the skeletal system. These functions return a link to the joint (similar to a link that holds the address of a web page on the web).

 

As an example, some of the functions to access the individual joints of an alien object are illustrated, accompanied by an X-ray view of the alien’s internal joints. (NOTE: Due to page space limitations, not all the alien’s joint access functions are listed here.)

Functions that link to an internal joint of an object

 

The link returned by calling one of these functions provides access to the specified joint of the object, for example, if we wanted a ball to move to the alien’s right hand in a game of catch with another alien, we could write the instruction statement:

 

ball.moveTo target: alien.getRightHand

 

It should be noted that these functions are dependent upon the design in the 3D Model for which the object is constructed. For example, the X-ray view of the alien and hare shows that each has the same core set of biped joints but the hare also has a set of joints in its ears that are specific to the Hare class (not available to other bipeds).

 

X-ray view of alien and hare internal joints

 

These commonalities and differences are reflected in the functional methods that get access to an internal joint. Functions that return a link to a biped’s common joints are defined in the SBiped class, as shown. The tiles are labeled “objectName,” which could be any biped object.

 

Common functional methods for biped joints

 

However, the hare has additional joints in its ears and tail. Functions to access these additional joints are provided immediately above those defined for bipeds, as shown.

 

Functions to access the joints in the hare’s ears and tail

 

Getters: Functions that return the dimension values of an object

The term “getter” is used to describe a function that returns the current value of a property. In Alice the three dimension (width, height, and depth) properties are of special importance and have their own getter functions. These getter functions for the alien are shown in the figure. The table summarizes these functions.

 

Functions that return dimension property values

 

Functions that return dimension value

 

Function

Return type

Description

getWidth

DecimalNumber

Returns the width (left to right)

getHeight

DecimalNumber

Returns the height (bottom to top)

getDepth

DecimalNumber

Returns the depth (front to back)

 

 

Other functions

Some functions do not neatly fit into the descriptive categories of the preceding paragraphs. We have collected these functions into a category called “Other.” Other functions are shown in the figure and summarized in the table.

 

Other functional methods

 

Other functional methods

 

Function

Return type

Arguments

Description

isFacing

Boolean

Model

Returns true if this object is facing the other (a 3D Model object) or else returns false

getDistanceTo

DecimalNumber

Model

Returns the distance from the center point of this object to the center point of the other (a 3D Model object)

getVantagePoint

???

entity

TO BE IMPLEMENTED. Returns the point of view of this object

isCollidingWith

Boolean

Model

returns true if the bounding box of this object intersects in any with the bounding box of the other ( 3D Model object), false otherwise

toString

TextString

 

NOTE: THIS DOES NOT RETURN THE IDENTIFIER NAME OF THIS OBJECT IN PROGRAM CODE, but the internal identifier used by Alice in the virtual machine

 

 

Functions for User Input

Functions that ask the user to use the keyboard or mouse to enter a value (of a specific type) are provided for all objects in an Alice scene. The value entered by the user is returned by the function, to be stored in a variable or used as an argument in a call to another procedure or function. Functions for User Input are shown.

 

Functions for User Input

 

When a user input function is called, at runtime, a dialog box is displayed containing a prompt to ask the user to enter a value of a specific type. Of course, Alice does not automatically know what prompt to use in the dialog box. The programmer supplies a prompt that will be displayed. The prompt is the argument to the function within an instruction statement.

 

An important part of calling a function to get user input is that the value the user enters is expected to be of a specific type. For example, the value the user enters when the getIntegerFromUser function is called must be a whole number, not a number containing a decimal or a fraction. Likewise, a variable or a parameter that receives the returned value must be a compatible type with the type of value being returned by the function. For example, if the user enters a String of alphabetic characters, the String cannot be stored in an Integer variable. For this reason, Alice will continue to display the user input dialog box until the user enters a value of the right type.

 

To each row of the following table, we have attached an image depicting a sample dialog box containing a prompt appropriate as an argument for calling that function.

 

 

User input Table

Function

Return type

Argument

Description

getBooleanFromUser

Boolean

TextString

Displays the dialog box with the TextString argument displayed as the prompt and True and False buttons for user input.

 

getStringFromUser

TextString

TextString

Displays the dialog box with the TextString argument displayed as the prompt and a textbox for user input.

 

getDoubleFromUser

DecimalNumber

TextString

Displays the dialog box with the TextString argument displayed as the prompt and a keypad (with a decimal point) for user input.

getIntegerFromUser

WholeNumber

TextString

Displays the dialog box with the TextString argument displayed as the prompt and a keypad for user input.

 

 

PROPERTY METHODS

 

Setter is a specialized term used to describe a procedure that changes the value of an object’s property. Gettercis a specialized term used to describe a function that returns the current value of an object’s property. Currently in Alice 3, most setters and getters can be found in the Procedures and Functions tabs of the Methods Panel. (For example, setVehiclecis in the Procedures tab, and getWidth is in the Functions tab.)

 

Some properties, however, are general purpose in that they are defined for the purpose of rendering an object in the scene. Getters and setters for these properties are conveniently listed in the Properties tab of the Methods panel. For example, the alien’s setters and getters are shown in this figure and summarized in the table.

 

Getters and setters for specialized properties

 

Setters and Getters for specialized properties

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

setPaint

paint

Sets the paint value of this object to the paint argument

setOpacity

opacity

Used to set the transparency of this object by setting the opacity value of this object using a range of values from 0.0 (invisible) to 1.0 (fully opaque).

setName

name

NOTE: THIS DOES NOT CHANGE THE IDENTIFIER NAME OF THIS OBJECT IN PROGRAM CODE, but does change the internal identifier used by Alice for debugging purposes.

 

Function

Return type

Description

getPaint

paint

Returns the paint value of this object

getOpacity

DecimalNumber

Returns the opacity value in the range of 0.0 (invisible) to 1.0 (fully opaque).of this object

getName

TextString

NOTE: THIS DOES NOT RETURN THE IDENTIFIER NAME OF THIS OBJECT IN PROGRAM CODE, but the internal identifier used by Alice in the virtual machine.

getVehicle

Model

Returns a link to another object in the scene that is serving as the vehicle for this object

 

 

Methods that can be called on an object’s internal joints

 

Procedures

Almost all 3D model classes in the Gallery have a system of internal joints. The joints can be thought of as the pivot points of sub-parts of the object and can be used in the Scene editor to position sub-parts during scene setup. An object's joints are also objects, and program statements can be written to animate an object’s sub-parts by rotating and orienting an object's internal joints. Procedures that can be used to animate joints are shown.

 

Procedural methods for an object's internal joints

 

These procedures perform the same actions that were described for the entire object, but the pivot point is at the joint. For example, a statement can be created to tell the alien to turn its right shoulder joint backward, as shown. As the right shoulder joint turns, the right upper arm, lower arm, and hand also turn. That is, the arm parts are attached to the body through the shoulder joint. For this reason, the arms parts turn when the joint turns.

 

A statement to turn the alien's right shoulder joint

 

Notice that the procedures in Figure A.15 do not include methods that movethe joint. In Alice 3, a joint cannot be moved out of its normal position within the skeletal structure of the object’s body. In other words, a joint and its attached sub-part(s) cannot be separated from the body. The only unique procedure for joints is setPivotVisible, as described in this table.

 

Procedure specific to internal joints

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

setPivotVisible

true or false

Displays the pivot position and orientation of this joint in the animation if the argument is true, hides the pivot position and orientation of this joint in the animation if the argument is false

 

Functions

Almost all functional methods for an entire object are functions that access (return a link to) one of the joints belonging to that object. However, there are only a few functions that can be called on an individual joint, as shown.

 

Functional methods for a joint

 

The available functional methods have the same name and perform the same actions as the functions of the same name for the entire object. Refer back to Table A.7 for the descriptions of these methods. The only function that is unique to joints is the isPivotVisiblefunction, as summarized below.

 

A unique function for internal joints

Function

Return Type

Description

isPivotVisible

Boolean

Returns true if the pivot position and orientation of this joint in the animation is being displayed, or else returns false if the pivot position and orientation of this joint in the animation is not being displayed

 

Properties

All of the available getters and setters on the Properties tab/Methods panel of an object’s internal joints are the same as the getters and setters of the same name for the entire object, as shown. Refer to the table for descriptions of these specialized methods.

 

Properties methods for internal joints

 

 

METHODS FOR STANDARD OBJECTS

 

Scene

Every Alice project has a scene (this) that is an instance of the Scene class and contains two other standard objects: the ground or water surface (an instance of the Ground class), and the camera (an instance of the Camera class), as shown. Each of these objects has their own procedures, functions, and properties, as defined in their respective classes.

 

The standard components of every Alice project

 

The Scene class has a few procedures, functions and property methods that are exactly the same as in other classes, as shown in the next three figures. See previous descriptions of these procedures, functions, and properties earlier in this section.

 

Procedural methods in common with other classes

 

Functional methods in common with other classes

 

Properties methods in common with other classes

 

The scene is truly the “universe” of an Alice 3 project because it provides the stage, the actors, and the scenery for animation. For this reason, a scene object has need of many special methods that perform unique operations for creating the scene and animating the characters in the story or game. Unique procedures that are used for setting up a scene and managing the animation are shown.

 

Unique procedural methods defined in Scene

 

The Alice environment automatically calls the performGeneratedSetUp, performCustomSetup, and initializeEventListeners procedures (in order) when the user clicks on the Run button. The performGeneratedSetUp procedure contains instructions that were automatically “recorded” as objects were created and arranged in the Scene editor. When performGeneratedSetUp is executed, these instructions are used by the Alice system to re-create the scene in the runtime window. The performCustomSetup procedure contains instructions that may have been written to adjust the scene in a way not available in the Scene editor. The initializeEventListeners procedure contains instructions to start listeners for events such as key presses and mouse clicks while the animation is running. (Specific events and listeners are described below in the Scene Listeners section.) After these three procedures are executed, the scene’s myFirstMethod is called and the animation code in the project is executed. Th following table provides further information regarding these unique procedural methods.

 

Procedures for this scene

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

performCustomSetup

 

Allows the programmer to make adjustments to the starting scene; adjustments that could not be easily made in the Scene Editor. Add program statements to this procedure as is done in any method in Alice. However, all statements here will be executed after the Run… button is clicked, but before the runtime window is displayed

performGeneratedSetup

 

When the Run… button is clicked, Alice inspects the scene built in the Scene Editor and generates the appropriate code necessary to display the scene created by the user in the runtime window. NOTE: the programmer should not attempt to add or modify code in this procedure, as it is always rewritten whenever the Run… button is clicked.

initializeEventListeners

 

This procedure of the Scene class is the preferred location in an Alice project for the implementation of event listeners. When the Run… button is clicked, Alice inspects this procedure and generates the appropriate code necessary to implement the listeners for the project. See section below on listener procedures

handleActiveChanged

isActive, activationCount

TO BE IMPLEMENTED

myFirstMethod

 

This is where an Alice animation starts, once the runtime window is displayed. Normally this is the method where the programmer creates program statements that control the overall execution of the animation. (A possible exception is performCustomSetUp, as described above).

 

 

This(scene’s) unique properties:

 

Properties methods for Scene class

 

The setters and getters of the Scene class are used to adjust the sky color, the lighting, and the amount of fog in a scene as an animation program is running, as summarized in the next table. These methods are useful for changing the appearance of the scene while the animation is being performed (not for setting up the scene in the Scene editor). For example, to change the scene from a daytime to a nighttime setting, the color of the sky could be made darker and the light in the scene could be decreased.

 

 

Properties setters and getters for Scene class

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

setAtmosphereColor

color

Sets the color of the sky in this scene

setAmbientLightColor

color

Sets the color of the primary light source in this scene. Think of it as the color of sunlight in an outdoor scene

setFogDensity

DecimalNumber

Used to set the density of the fog in this scene by setting the density value in the range of values from 0.0 (no fog) to 1.0 (no visibility of objects within the fog).

setFromAboveLightColor

color

Sets the color of a secondary light source from above in this scene

setFromBelowLightColor

color

Sets the color of a secondary light source from below in this scene

 

 

 

Function

Return Type

Description

getAtmosphereColor

color

Returns the color of the sky in this scene

getAmbientLightColor

color

Returns the color of the primary light source in this scene; tyou might think of it as the color of sunlight in an outdoor scene

getFogDensity

DecimalNumber

Returns the value of the density of the fog in this scene by getting the density value with a range of values from 0.0 (no fog) to 1.0 (no visibility of objects within the fog).

getFromAboveLightColor

color

Returns the color of a secondary light source from above in this scene

getFromBelowLightColor

color

Returns the color of a secondary light source from below in this scene

 

 

addListener procedures

Listeners are used for creating interactive programs, especially games. Interactive means that the user is expected to use the keyboard, mouse, or some other input device to control the actions that occur as the program is running.

 

A listener is an object that, as a program is running, “listens” for a targeted event and responds to that event when it occurs. For example, a mouse-click on object listener will listen for a user to mouse-click on an object in the scene. When the mouse-click on an object occurs, we say the “targeted event has been triggered.” When the event is triggered, the listener executes specified instruction statements in response.

 

In Alice, to create an interactive program, a Listener object must be added to the scene. A listener object is added to the scene by calling an addListener procedure, where Listener is a targeted event. For example, addDefaultModeManipulation creates a listener object that targets a mouse-click on any object in the scene and responds by allowing the user to drag that object around the scene while the animation is running.

 

This figure shows a list of addListener procedural methods. The table summarizes details about the addListener methods, in terms of what event is targeted and how the listener responds.

 

addListener procedural methods

 

 addListener target and response

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

adddefaultModelManipulation

 

Allows the use the mouse to reposition an object in the virtual world as a program is executing. Ctrl-click turns the object, shift-click raises and lowers the object

addSceneActivationListener

Scene

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addKeyPressListener

Key

responds to keyboard input from the user. Able to differentiate between Letter, Number, and Arrow keys

addArrowKeyPressListener

Key

responds to keyboard input from the user, specifically for Arrow keys (UP, DOWN, LEFT, RIGHT)

addNumberKeyPressListener

Key

responds to keyboard input from the user, specifically for Number keys (0..9)

addObjectMoverFor

Entity

The parameter object will be moved FORWARD, BACKWARD, LEFT, and RIGHT, based on its own orientation, when the user presses the UP, DOWN, LEFT, and RIGHT arrow keys respectively

addPointOfViewChangeListener

transformationListener, shouldListenTo

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addCollisionStartListener

collisionListener, Group1, Group2

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addCollisionEndListener

collisionListener, Group1, Group2

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addProximityEnterListener

proximityListener, Group1, Group2, distance

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addProximityExitListener

proximityListener, Group1, Group2, distance

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addOcclusionStartListener

occlusionEventListener, Group1, Group2

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addOcclusionEndListener

occlusionEventListener, Group1, Group2

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addMouseClickOnScreenListener

???

responds to mouse click input from the user, anywhere on the screen

addMouseClickOnObjectListener

???

responds to mouse click input from the user, on the specified object

addTimeListener

???

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addViewEnterListener

???, ???

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

addViewExitListener

???, ???

UNDER DEVELOPMENT

 

Ground

The Ground class has only a limited number of procedural, functional, and property methods, all of which behave exactly the same as those defined by other classes. The following three figures show the methods for the Ground class. These methods were summarized previously.

 

Procedural methods for Ground class

 

Functional method for Ground class

 

Specialized property methods for Ground class

 

Camera

The camera has many procedural methods that behave exactly the same as those defined by other classes, as shown in in this figure and summarized previously.

 

camera procedures

 

.

Camera's procedural methods in common with other classes

 

One of the procedural methods shown above in Figure A.29, is defined only for the camera: moveAndOrientToAGoodVantagePointOf, as described below.

 

Unique Procedural method for Camera class

Procedure

Argument(s)

Description

moveAndOrientToAGoodVantagePointOf

entity

Animates the reposition and reorientation of the camera from its current position to the vantage point of the entity

 

The Camera class also has only a limited number of functional, and property methods, all of which behave exactly the same as those defined by other classes. The following figures show the functional and property methods for the Camera class. These methods were summarized previously.

 

Camera functional methods

 

Camera property methods

 

 

 

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